Statewide

Queensland’s leading women of Community Services have the majority rule

 

There are close to 288,000 workers in the Queensland Health and Community Services Industry and 230,000 are women1.   

It’s a trend that remains consistent in the industry’s leadership roles with 6,500 women in managerial roles versus 2,500 men1.

With Queensland Women’s Week upon us (from 6 – 12 March 2017), the Community Services Industry Alliance (CSIA) partnered with the Queensland Government, YWCA through a Women’s Week grant, and Resonate to profile five of Queensland’s most influential leading women of Community Services.

“It’s crucial we highlight the successes of women in the Community Services Industry for being more than just caregiving roles,” says Belinda Drew, herself a leading woman of Community Services as the CSIA CEO.

“We want young women moving through their community service careers to look at women like Anita Veivers, Jennifer Cullen, Karyn Walsh, Robyn Cavanagh and Tracy Adams because they are strong, influential trailblazers in our Industry.

“They’re not only achieving outstanding things for the organisations they lead and the Industry more broadly, they’re also lighting up the path for the young women coming behind them,” said Ms Drew.

“Anita came out to Australia from the UK when she met her husband, and has spent 30 years in the field and almost 24 years supporting the disability community in Cairns.

“Jennifer has been with Synapse since 2004 and grown into her leadership role there as the organisation itself has grown. She’s been the Synapse CEO since 2008.

“Karyn is a well-known identity in the Queensland Community Services Industry. She’s been around for a substantial number of years in various roles, including in her position as CEO of Micah and eight years as President of the QCOSS Board.

“Robyn successfully challenged the not-for-profit model of delivering disability support. She did this more than 20 years ago when it was a highly innovative thing to do. Along with her husband, she built a for-profit, client-centred business that has flourished in the face of most people believing her services were the domain of not-for-profit entities.

“And Tracy has seen yourtown through a monumental transition of 55 years as the iconic BoysTown brand to a new creative identity that showcases its inclusive and energetic work with young people nationally.”

Drew said it is because of women like these that the next generation of young female leaders will struggle less to counter the male idioms arising from the notions of business and leadership.  

“The Queensland Community Services Industry does more than positively change the lives of the vulnerable and people in need, it is an industry like any other and offers tremendous opportunity in the corporate and back-of-house space, regardless of gender.

“The skills of our workforce are diversifying as is the professional background from which that workforce comes,” said Drew.

“The opportunities for women to lead in community services organisations are no longer dependent on them having worked their way through traditional human service pathways.

“Industry-wide we’re seeing an immense amount of external pressure impacting the way we do business, and with that many organisations are having to all look at changing business models.

“Change can be challenging but with it comes opportunity. Let’s embrace it together and push forward to new and better ways of working, including recognising the great work of women in leadership roles,” Drew said.

The Leading Women in Community Service Profiles will be officially launched at an International Women’s Day lunch on Wednesday 8 March, 2017.

The event hosted by the CSIA, McCullough Robertson Lawyers and UnitingCare Queensland will feature a panel of the five women discussing their pathway to leadership and that of future generations.


Media are welcome at the event.

To register your attendance, please email louise@louisehughesmarketing.com


Media contact

Louise Hughes

Louise Hughes Marketing

louise@louisehughesmarketing.com

0409 583 971

Louise Hughes Marketing

 


Quick facts

According to the ABS as at June 2015, the sex ratio (the number of males per 100 females) in Queensland was 99.1. Females outnumbered males in both Greater Brisbane (with a sex ratio of 98.7) and the rest of Queensland (99.6).

Among respondents 51.4% of Board Directors were women compared to 48.5% men. But, women were more likely to be on boards with a turnover of less than $1M and men were more likely to be on boards with a turnover greater than $30M2.


References:

1 Health & Community Services Industry Labour Force Snapshot – May Quarter 2015

2 ACOSS – NFP Boards and Gender Diversity 2012

Brisbane

Three Brisbane women centre stage for Leading Women of Community Services showcase.

 

At the centre of a Leading Women of Community Services showcase this Queensland Women’s Week, are three extraordinary Brisbane women.

Jennifer Cullen (CEO, Synapse), Karyn Walsh (CEO, Micah Projects) and Tracy Adams (CEO, yourtown) stand proudly alongside regional counterparts Anita Veivers (Executive Director, Centacare Cairns) and Robyn Cavanagh (Director, Quality Lifestyle Support, Toowoomba).

There are close to 288,000 workers in the Queensland Health and Community Services Industry and 230,000 are women1.  

It’s a trend that remains consistent in the industry’s leadership roles with 6,500 women in managerial roles versus 2,500 men1.

With Queensland Women’s Week upon us (from 6 – 12 March 2017), the Community Services Industry Alliance (CSIA) partnered with the Queensland GovernmentYWCA through a Women’s Week grant, and Resonate to profile five of Queensland’s most influential leading women of Community Services.

“It’s crucial we highlight the successes of women in the Community Services Industry for being more than just caregiving roles,” says Belinda Drew, herself a leading woman of Community Services as the CSIA CEO.

“We want young women moving through their community service careers to look at women like Jennifer, Karyn, and Tracy because they are strong, influential trailblazers in our Industry.

“They’re not only achieving outstanding things for the organisations they lead and the Industry more broadly, they’re also lighting up the path for the young women coming behind them,” said Ms Drew.

“Jennifer has been with Synapse since 2004 and grown into her leadership role there as the organisation itself has grown. She’s been the Synapse CEO since 2008.

“Karyn is a well-known identity in the Queensland Community Services Industry. She’s been around for a substantial number of years in various roles, including in her position as CEO of Micah and eight years as President of the QCOSS Board.

“And Tracy has seen yourtown through a monumental transition of 55 years as the iconic BoysTown brand to a new creative identity that showcases its inclusive and energetic work with young people nationally.”

Drew said it is because of women like these that the next generation of young female leaders will struggle less to counter the male idioms arising from the notions of business and leadership.  

“The Queensland Community Services Industry does more than positively change the lives of the vulnerable and people in need, it is an industry like any other and offers tremendous opportunity in the corporate and back-of-house space, regardless of gender.

“The skills of our workforce are diversifying as is the professional background from which that workforce comes,” said Drew.

“The opportunities for women to lead in community services organisations are no longer dependent on them having worked their way through traditional human service pathways.

“Industry-wide we’re seeing an immense amount of external pressure impacting the way we do business, and with that many organisations are having to all look at changing business models.

“Change can be challenging but with it comes opportunity. Let’s embrace it together and push forward to new and better ways of working, including recognising the great work of women in leadership roles,” Drew said.

The Leading Women in Community Service Profiles will be officially launched at an International Women’s Day lunch on Wednesday 8 March, 2017.

The event hosted by the CSIA, McCullough Robertson Lawyers and UnitingCare Queensland will feature a panel of the five women discussing their pathway to leadership and that of future generations.


Media are welcome at the event.

To register your attendance, please email louise@louisehughesmarketing.com


Media contact

Louise Hughes

Louise Hughes Marketing

louise@louisehughesmarketing.com

0409 583 971

Louise Hughes Marketing

 


Quick facts

According to the ABS as at June 2015, the sex ratio (the number of males per 100 females) in Queensland was 99.1. Females outnumbered males in both Greater Brisbane (with a sex ratio of 98.7) and the rest of Queensland (99.6).

Among respondents 51.4% of Board Directors were women compared to 48.5% men. But, women were more likely to be on boards with a turnover of less than $1M and men were more likely to be on boards with a turnover greater than $30M2.


References:

1 Health & Community Services Industry Labour Force Snapshot – May Quarter 2015

2 ACOSS – NFP Boards and Gender Diversity 2012

 

Cairns

Cairns woman centre stage for Leading Women of Community Services showcase.

 

At the centre of a Leading Women of Community Services showcase this Queensland Women’s Week is Centacare Cairns’ Executive Director, Anita Veivers.

There are close to 288,000 workers in the Queensland Health and Community Services Industry and 230,000 are women1.  

It’s a trend that remains consistent in the industry’s leadership roles with 6,500 women in managerial roles versus 2,500 men1.

With Queensland Women’s Week upon us (from 6 – 12 March 2017), the Community Services Industry Alliance (CSIA) partnered with the Queensland Government, YWCA through a Women’s Week grant, and Resonate to profile five of Queensland’s most influential leading women of Community Services.

Anita stands proudly alongside her counterparts across the state –  Jennifer Cullen (CEO, Synapse, Brisbane), Karyn Walsh (CEO, Micah Projects, Brisbane), Tracy Adams (CEO, yourtown, Brisbane) and Robyn Cavanagh (Director, Quality Lifestyle Support, Toowoomba).

“It’s crucial we highlight the successes of women in the Community Services Industry for being more than just caregiving roles,” says Belinda Drew, herself a leading woman of Community Services as the CSIA CEO.

“We want young women moving through their community service careers to look at women like Anita because they are strong, influential trailblazers in our Industry.

“She’s not only achieving outstanding things for the organisation she leads and the Industry more broadly, she’s also lighting up the path for the young women coming behind her,” said Drew.

“Anita came out to Australia from the UK when she met her husband, and has spent 30 years in the field and almost 24 years supporting the disability community in Cairns.

“She’s well known in the community through her longstanding role at ARC Disability Services. Now she’s taking on her next challenge, leading Centacare Cairns.

Drew said it is because of women like these that the next generation of young female leaders will struggle less to counter the male idioms arising from the notions of business and leadership.  

“The Queensland Community Services Industry does more than positively change the lives of the vulnerable and people in need, it is an industry like any other and offers tremendous opportunity in the corporate and back-of-house space, regardless of gender.

“The skills of our workforce are diversifying as is the professional background from which that workforce comes,” said Drew.

“The opportunities for women to lead in community services organisations are no longer dependent on them having worked their way through traditional human service pathways.

“Industry-wide we’re seeing an immense amount of external pressure impacting the way we do business, and with that many organisations are having to all look at changing business models.

“Change can be challenging but with it comes opportunity. Let’s embrace it together and push forward to new and better ways of working, including recognising the great work of women in leadership roles,” Drew said.

The Leading Women in Community Service Profiles will be officially launched at an International Women’s Day lunch on Wednesday 8 March, 2017.

The event hosted by the CSIA, McCullough Robertson Lawyers and UnitingCare Queensland will feature a panel of the five women discussing their pathway to leadership and that of future generations.


Media are welcome at the event.
To register your attendance, please email louise@louisehughesmarketing.com


Media contact

Louise Hughes

Louise Hughes Marketing

louise@louisehughesmarketing.com

0409 583 971

Louise Hughes Marketing


Quick facts

According to the ABS as at June 2015, the sex ratio (the number of males per 100 females) in Queensland was 99.1. Females outnumbered males in both Greater Brisbane (with a sex ratio of 98.7) and the rest of Queensland (99.6).

Among respondents 51.4% of Board Directors were women compared to 48.5% men. But, women were more likely to be on boards with a turnover of less than $1M and men were more likely to be on boards with a turnover greater than $30M2.


References:

1 Health & Community Services Industry Labour Force Snapshot – May Quarter 2015

2 ACOSS – NFP Boards and Gender Diversity 2012

Toowoomba

Toowoomba woman centre stage for Leading Women of Community Services showcase.

 

At the centre of a Leading Women of Community Services showcase this Queensland Women’s Week is Robyn Cavanagh, Director of Toowoomba’s Quality Lifestyle Support.

There are close to 288,000 workers in the Queensland Health and Community Services Industry and 230,000 are women1.  

It’s a trend that remains consistent in the industry’s leadership roles with 6,500 women in managerial roles versus 2,500 men1.

With Queensland Women’s Week upon us (from 6 – 12 March 2017), the Community Services Industry Alliance (CSIA) partnered with the Queensland Government, YWCA through a Women’s Week grant, and Resonate to profile five of Queensland’s most influential leading women of Community Services.

Robyn stands proudly alongside her counterparts across the state –  Jennifer Cullen (CEO, Synapse, Brisbane), Karyn Walsh (CEO, Micah Projects, Brisbane), Tracy Adams (CEO, yourtown, Brisbane) and Anita Veivers (Executive Director, Centacare Cairns).

“It’s crucial we highlight the successes of women in the Community Services Industry for being more than just caregiving roles,” says Belinda Drew, herself a leading woman of Community Services as the CSIA CEO.

“We want young women moving through their community service careers to look at women like Robyn because they are strong, influential trailblazers in our Industry.

“She’s not only achieving outstanding things for the organisation she leads and the Industry more broadly, she’s also lighting up the path for the young women coming behind her,” said Drew.

“Robyn successfully challenged the not-for-profit model of delivering disability support, and she did this more than 20 years ago when it was a highly innovative thing to do.

“Along with her husband, she built a for-profit, client-centred business that has flourished in the face of most people believing her services were the domain of not-for-profit entities.”

Drew said it is because of women like these that the next generation of young female leaders will struggle less to counter the male idioms arising from the notions of business and leadership.  

“The Queensland Community Services Industry does more than positively change the lives of the vulnerable and people in need, it is an industry like any other and offers tremendous opportunity in the corporate and back-of-house space, regardless of gender.

“The skills of our workforce are diversifying as is the professional background from which that workforce comes,” said Drew.

“The opportunities for women to lead in community services organisations are no longer dependent on them having worked their way through traditional human service pathways.

“Industry-wide we’re seeing an immense amount of external pressure impacting the way we do business, and with that many organisations are having to all look at changing business models.

“Change can be challenging but with it comes opportunity. Let’s embrace it together and push forward to new and better ways of working, including recognising the great work of women in leadership roles,” Drew said.

The Leading Women in Community Service Profiles will be officially launched at an International Women’s Day lunch on Wednesday 8 March, 2017.

The event hosted by the CSIA, McCullough Robertson Lawyers, and UnitingCare Queensland will feature a panel of the five women discussing their pathway to leadership and that of future generations.


Media are welcome at the event.

To register your attendance, please email louise@louisehughesmarketing.com


Media contact

Louise Hughes

Louise Hughes Marketing

louise@louisehughesmarketing.com

0409 583 971

Louise Hughes Marketing

 


Quick facts

According to the ABS as at June 2015, the sex ratio (the number of males per 100 females) in Queensland was 99.1. Females outnumbered males in both Greater Brisbane (with a sex ratio of 98.7) and the rest of Queensland (99.6).

Among respondents 51.4% of Board Directors were women compared to 48.5% men. But, women were more likely to be on boards with a turnover of less than $1M and men were more likely to be on boards with a turnover greater than $30M2

 


References:

1 Health & Community Services Industry Labour Force Snapshot – May Quarter 2015

2 ACOSS – NFP Boards and Gender Diversity 2012